Tag Archives: anthony

Guam Police Department Operation Blue House

David Manila, Anthony Quenga and Mario Laxamana of Guam Police Department

More police officers could be charged in the Blue House brothel case, but that possibility doesn’t “negate the guilt” of the three officers who already were indicted, according to the Office of the Attorney General.

A defense attorney in the case has argued that prosecutors have been unfair by indicting some police officers in the Blue House case while ignoring allegations against others, but a prosecutor has called this argument “nonsensical.”

Assistant Attorney General Nelson Werner said this in Superior Court of Guam documents filed earlier this week. More than 100 pages of documents were filed in the case shortly before a motion cutoff date on Monday.

Three officers were indicted in the Blue House caseMario Laxamana, Anthony Quenga and David Manila. In a motion to dismiss, Manila’s attorney has alleged that more officers are identified and accused in confidential documents.

“First, at this juncture, there are only three officers that have been accused of misconduct in connection with Blue House,” Werner wrote “… Furthermore, defendant Manila’s attempt to (publicize) the names of these other officers appears to be more sensationalism than an attempt to secure justice.”

Werner was responding to a motion to dismiss by defense attorney William Pole.

Pole argues that discovery documents filed in the case include allegations against at least 11 other police officers, and that prosecutors have shown no evidence that they investigated the allegations against other officers.

Discovery documents are confidential documents accessible only to attorneys in the case. None of the officers who allegedly are identified in the discovery documents have been identified publicly.

Regardless, Pole has said the unprosecuted officers are evidence of “prosecutorial vindictiveness.”

In the response filed Monday, Werner neither confirmed nor denied that the discovery documents implicate other police officers, but he did say the documents identify some other officers and “possible defendants.” The investigation into the Blue House brothel continues, Werner said.

“Suffice it to say, if charges are warranted, they will be brought but not on the timetable demanded by the defense,” Werner wrote. “If there is probable cause to charge them at some later time they will be charged.”

In another motion, Pole took his allegations even further, arguing that prosecutors stopped witnesses from testifying about the involvement of other officers during grand jury proceedings. Grand jury proceedings determine if prosecutors have a strong enough case to indict a suspect. They are closed to the public.

In response to these allegations, Werner argues that only pertinent testimony is provided during grand jury proceedings. Prosecutors were seeking an indictment against only three officers, so only testimony related to those officers was pertinent, Werner said.

The Blue House lounge was a Tamuning brothel that masqueraded as a karaoke bar from 2004 to 2008. Brothel owner Song Ja Cha already has been sentenced to life in prison in federal court, but the local court case has expanded to include police officers. All three officers face allegations of kidnapping and prostitution, and Manila and Quenga have been accused of rape.

Lengthy arguments on the pending motions are set for Dec. 24. Jury selection is scheduled for early January.

Motion for severance

The numerous court arguments submitted on Monday pertain to several motions to dismiss the Blue House case before it goes to trial — and at least one motion that would create multiple trials.

Laxamana, one of the police officer suspects, asked for his trial to be severed from that of the other defendants, which would mean his trial would be held separately. If Laxamana’s motion for severance is granted, Manila wants a separate trial also, according to court documents.

Werner has opposed the request for separate trials. The prosecutor wrote in court documents that the allegations against the Blue House suspects are intertwined, and the vast majority of evidence in the case applies to all of them.

Withdrawal requested

Finally, one of the defense attorneys in the case has asked to withdraw.

Leevin Camacho, who represents Quenga — the third police officer suspect — argues that he must withdraw because he has previously represented Saknin Weria, who will be a witness in the upcoming trial.

It is unclear which attorney will take over representing Quenga if Camacho withdraws from the case.

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Prosecutors have been unfair by indicting some police officers in the Blue House case

David Manila, Anthony Quenga and Mario Laxamana of Guam Police Department

David Manila, Anthony Quenga and Mario Laxamana of Guam Police Department

More police officers could be charged in the Blue House brothel case, but that possibility doesn’t “negate the guilt” of the three officers who already were indicted, according to the Office of the Attorney General.

A defense attorney in the case has argued that prosecutors have been unfair by indicting some police officers in the Blue House case while ignoring allegations against others, but a prosecutor has called this argument “nonsensical.”

Assistant Attorney General Nelson Werner said this in Superior Court of Guam documents filed earlier this week. More than 100 pages of documents were filed in the case shortly before a motion cutoff date on Monday.

Three officers were indicted in the Blue House caseMario Laxamana, Anthony Quenga and David Manila. In a motion to dismiss, Manila’s attorney has alleged that more officers are identified and accused in confidential documents.

“First, at this juncture, there are only three officers that have been accused of misconduct in connection with Blue House,” Werner wrote “… Furthermore, defendant Manila’s attempt to (publicize) the names of these other officers appears to be more sensationalism than an attempt to secure justice.”

Werner was responding to a motion to dismiss by defense attorney William Pole.

Pole argues that discovery documents filed in the case include allegations against at least 11 other police officers, and that prosecutors have shown no evidence that they investigated the allegations against other officers.

Discovery documents are confidential documents accessible only to attorneys in the case. None of the officers who allegedly are identified in the discovery documents have been identified publicly.

Regardless, Pole has said the unprosecuted officers are evidence of “prosecutorial vindictiveness.”

In the response filed Monday, Werner neither confirmed nor denied that the discovery documents implicate other police officers, but he did say the documents identify some other officers and “possible defendants.” The investigation into the Blue House brothel continues, Werner said.

“Suffice it to say, if charges are warranted, they will be brought but not on the timetable demanded by the defense,” Werner wrote. “If there is probable cause to charge them at some later time they will be charged.”

In another motion, Pole took his allegations even further, arguing that prosecutors stopped witnesses from testifying about the involvement of other officers during grand jury proceedings. Grand jury proceedings determine if prosecutors have a strong enough case to indict a suspect. They are closed to the public.

In response to these allegations, Werner argues that only pertinent testimony is provided during grand jury proceedings. Prosecutors were seeking an indictment against only three officers, so only testimony related to those officers was pertinent, Werner said.

The Blue House lounge was a Tamuning brothel that masqueraded as a karaoke bar from 2004 to 2008. Brothel owner Song Ja Cha already has been sentenced to life in prison in federal court, but the local court case has expanded to include police officers. All three officers face allegations of kidnapping and prostitution, and Manila and Quenga have been accused of rape.

Lengthy arguments on the pending motions are set for Dec. 24. Jury selection is scheduled for early January.

Motion for severance

The numerous court arguments submitted on Monday pertain to several motions to dismiss the Blue House case before it goes to trial — and at least one motion that would create multiple trials.

Laxamana, one of the police officer suspects, asked for his trial to be severed from that of the other defendants, which would mean his trial would be held separately. If Laxamana’s motion for severance is granted, Manila wants a separate trial also, according to court documents.

Werner has opposed the request for separate trials. The prosecutor wrote in court documents that the allegations against the Blue House suspects are intertwined, and the vast majority of evidence in the case applies to all of them.

Withdrawal requested

Finally, one of the defense attorneys in the case has asked to withdraw.

Leevin Camacho, who represents Quenga — the third police officer suspect — argues that he must withdraw because he has previously represented Saknin Weria, who will be a witness in the upcoming trial.

It is unclear which attorney will take over representing Quenga if Camacho withdraws from the case.

More police could be charged in Blue House case on Guam

David Manila, Anthony Quenga and Mario Laxamana of Guam Police Department

David Manila, Anthony Quenga and Mario Laxamana of Guam Police Department

More police officers could be charged in the Blue House brothel case, but that possibility doesn’t “negate the guilt” of the three officers who already were indicted, according to the Office of the Attorney General.

A defense attorney in the case has argued that prosecutors have been unfair by indicting some police officers in the Blue House case while ignoring allegations against others, but a prosecutor has called this argument “nonsensical.”

Assistant Attorney General Nelson Werner said this in Superior Court of Guam documents filed earlier this week. More than 100 pages of documents were filed in the case shortly before a motion cutoff date on Monday.

Three officers were indicted in the Blue House caseMario Laxamana, Anthony Quenga and David Manila. In a motion to dismiss, Manila’s attorney has alleged that more officers are identified and accused in confidential documents.

“First, at this juncture, there are only three officers that have been accused of misconduct in connection with Blue House,” Werner wrote “… Furthermore, defendant Manila’s attempt to (publicize) the names of these other officers appears to be more sensationalism than an attempt to secure justice.”

Werner was responding to a motion to dismiss by defense attorney William Pole.

Pole argues that discovery documents filed in the case include allegations against at least 11 other police officers, and that prosecutors have shown no evidence that they investigated the allegations against other officers.

Discovery documents are confidential documents accessible only to attorneys in the case. None of the officers who allegedly are identified in the discovery documents have been identified publicly.

Regardless, Pole has said the unprosecuted officers are evidence of “prosecutorial vindictiveness.”

In the response filed Monday, Werner neither confirmed nor denied that the discovery documents implicate other police officers, but he did say the documents identify some other officers and “possible defendants.” The investigation into the Blue House brothel continues, Werner said.

“Suffice it to say, if charges are warranted, they will be brought but not on the timetable demanded by the defense,” Werner wrote. “If there is probable cause to charge them at some later time they will be charged.”

In another motion, Pole took his allegations even further, arguing that prosecutors stopped witnesses from testifying about the involvement of other officers during grand jury proceedings. Grand jury proceedings determine if prosecutors have a strong enough case to indict a suspect. They are closed to the public.

In response to these allegations, Werner argues that only pertinent testimony is provided during grand jury proceedings. Prosecutors were seeking an indictment against only three officers, so only testimony related to those officers was pertinent, Werner said.

The Blue House lounge was a Tamuning brothel that masqueraded as a karaoke bar from 2004 to 2008. Brothel owner Song Ja Cha already has been sentenced to life in prison in federal court, but the local court case has expanded to include police officers. All three officers face allegations of kidnapping and prostitution, and Manila and Quenga have been accused of rape.

Lengthy arguments on the pending motions are set for Dec. 24. Jury selection is scheduled for early January.

Motion for severance

The numerous court arguments submitted on Monday pertain to several motions to dismiss the Blue House case before it goes to trial — and at least one motion that would create multiple trials.

Laxamana, one of the police officer suspects, asked for his trial to be severed from that of the other defendants, which would mean his trial would be held separately. If Laxamana’s motion for severance is granted, Manila wants a separate trial also, according to court documents.

Werner has opposed the request for separate trials. The prosecutor wrote in court documents that the allegations against the Blue House suspects are intertwined, and the vast majority of evidence in the case applies to all of them.

Withdrawal requested

Finally, one of the defense attorneys in the case has asked to withdraw.

Leevin Camacho, who represents Quenga — the third police officer suspect — argues that he must withdraw because he has previously represented Saknin Weria, who will be a witness in the upcoming trial.

It is unclear which attorney will take over representing Quenga if Camacho withdraws from the case.

Nine women were forced into prostitution at the Blue House lounge

Nine women were forced into prostitution at the Blue House lounge

Nine women were forced into prostitution at the Blue House lounge

Nine women were forced into prostitution at the Blue House lounge, and each of them has a story.

Blue House was a brothel that masqueraded as a karaoke lounge in Tamuning for four years. The brothel was shut down by a police raid in 2008, but the local court case — which now includes allegations against three police officers — continues today.

On the night of the police raid, some of the Blue House victims gave written statements to officers at the Tumon precinct. Later, other victims gave longer statements, which were folded into the Blue House case in the District Court of Guam.

Some of those statements describe how the women were lured from Chuuk. Others talk about how it took the women a few nights to realize what the Blue House lounge really was. Most of the statements explain that the women were trapped and powerless.

“And I did it because they forced me,” wrote one victim, who was 21 when she began to work at the Blue House lounge. “… I also did it feeling painfully and tortured. (The Blue House owner) said that I cannot run away because she would call the police. Then I myself have sexual intercourse with 12 men in the (VIP) room. Then I kept on crying because they said I can’t go see my relative’s home.”

‘I got really scared’

In her written statement, the Blue House victim wrote that she was the daughter of a minister in Chuuk.

Life was hard but happy in Chuuk, she wrote. But in 2007, she and her cousin decided to leave their home island after they were promised work in a restaurant in Guam.

Soon the cousins were in the Guam airport, where some people they didn’t know took away their passports and drove them to their new home. At Blue House, the women met Song Ja Cha, the owner of the lounge, who was called “mamasan” or “mamasang” by her workers.

After seeing the lounge, the women from Chuuk immediately wanted to return home, according to the written statement. In response, Cha said they would have to pay for passports and tickets to return home, so the cousins started working as waitresses at Blue House, not yet realizing the bar was a brothel.

For the first few nights, the 21-year-old victim didn’t know what the private rooms were for, she wrote.

“I got really scared when I understood what the small rooms were for but I didn’t even realize at that time … that I would have to have sex with the customers,” the victim wrote in her statement. “I was thinking that I should tell (my cousin) that we should run away but I couldn’t tell her because I saw there were people keeping their eyes on us and if they found out what we were talking about they would tell mamasang.”

After four nights of working at the lounge, Cha told the young woman to get drunk so she could “have a customer,” according to the victim statement. The woman obeyed, and later that night had sex for the first time with a Blue House customer.

The victim said she “got really sick” after.

“I did not work for two weeks because I believe I was gonna die. I just stayed in my room at the back of the bar,” the victim wrote in her statement. “At first mamasan seemed nice to me but then she would start scolding me again and tell me I’m just lying.”

This victim wrote one of the most detailed accounts of what happened at Blue House — but she isn’t alone.

‘I believed her words’

Federal prosecutors have said that Cha routinely would threaten her victims with arrest if they didn’t follow her orders. The women believed these threats because police officers frequented the lounge, said Jared Fishman, a trial attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice.

One of the other victims’ statements shows that Cha’s threats were powerful.

“She told me that if I leave work that night she would call for the police to look for me and arrest me then put me in jail,” wrote another victim, who was 23 at the time of the police raid. “I believed her words and I was scared of being arrested and so I stayed and do as I was told to do, I went and sat with customers.”

This victim also grew up in Chuuk, dreaming of becoming a doctor in the United States, according to her written statement. She also was lured to Guam by the promise of a high-paying job at a restaurant, according to her statement.

This woman came to Guam in March 2004. She worked at the Blue House for more than three years, but never got paid more than $100 to $300 per month, she wrote. The woman wrote that she had to resort to stealing bar chasers to eat.

The Blue House victims worked an average of 74 hours a week, without overtime, according to federal court documents.

“My first pay after one month of working was $300,” the victim wrote. “Mamasang showed me a paper showing that I earned $1,000 but after deductions my pay came down to $300 only. She explained that the deductions are for my airline ticket … for my birth certificate, departure fee, for sleeping while on the job, for being late to work, for speaking Chuukese, for eating chasers, for using too much toilet tissue, for using toothpicks, for use of shampoo, for using the phone …”

‘I did it and I cried’

These victim statements add a personal side to the allegations in the ongoing Blue House case, but they also provide a peek into the daily operations at the brothel.

There were six private rooms at the Blue House, according to federal prosecutors.

About 40 to 50 men went into the private rooms every night, wrote one victim, who worked at the Blue House lounge for about two months before the police raid.

“Then for myself about 10 to 20 men they force me to have sexual intercourse,” the victim wrote. “I did it and I cried and if I didn’t do it then they go out and complain then mamasang gets mad then she told me to get back. Then we are usually locked up in Blue House we cannot talk to our relatives then. Now I am happy I am relieved from torture.”

The five suspects in the Blue House case are expected to go to trial in the Superior Court of Guam in January. Several motions to dismiss the case are pending, and lengthy legal arguments are scheduled for Dec. 24.

Victim had sexual intercourse with 12 men in the Blue House Lounge

http://www.guampdn.com/videonetwork/2032075137001/Blue-House-From-2008-to-2012

Nine women were forced into prostitution at the Blue House lounge, and each of them has a story.

Blue House was a brothel that masqueraded as a karaoke lounge in Tamuning for four years. The brothel was shut down by a police raid in 2008, but the local court case — which now includes allegations against three police officers — continues today.

On the night of the police raid, some of the Blue House victims gave written statements to officers at the Tumon precinct. Later, other victims gave longer statements, which were folded into the Blue House case in the District Court of Guam.

Some of those statements describe how the women were lured from Chuuk. Others talk about how it took the women a few nights to realize what the Blue House lounge really was. Most of the statements explain that the women were trapped and powerless.

“And I did it because they forced me,” wrote one victim, who was 21 when she began to work at the Blue House lounge. “… I also did it feeling painfully and tortured. (The Blue House owner) said that I cannot run away because she would call the police. Then I myself have sexual intercourse with 12 men in the (VIP) room. Then I kept on crying because they said I can’t go see my relative’s home.”

‘I got really scared’

In her written statement, the Blue House victim wrote that she was the daughter of a minister in Chuuk.

Life was hard but happy in Chuuk, she wrote. But in 2007, she and her cousin decided to leave their home island after they were promised work in a restaurant in Guam.

Soon the cousins were in the Guam airport, where some people they didn’t know took away their passports and drove them to their new home. At Blue House, the women met Song Ja Cha, the owner of the lounge, who was called “mamasan” or “mamasang” by her workers.

After seeing the lounge, the women from Chuuk immediately wanted to return home, according to the written statement. In response, Cha said they would have to pay for passports and tickets to return home, so the cousins started working as waitresses at Blue House, not yet realizing the bar was a brothel.

For the first few nights, the 21-year-old victim didn’t know what the private rooms were for, she wrote.

“I got really scared when I understood what the small rooms were for but I didn’t even realize at that time … that I would have to have sex with the customers,” the victim wrote in her statement. “I was thinking that I should tell (my cousin) that we should run away but I couldn’t tell her because I saw there were people keeping their eyes on us and if they found out what we were talking about they would tell mamasang.”

After four nights of working at the lounge, Cha told the young woman to get drunk so she could “have a customer,” according to the victim statement. The woman obeyed, and later that night had sex for the first time with a Blue House customer.

The victim said she “got really sick” after.

“I did not work for two weeks because I believe I was gonna die. I just stayed in my room at the back of the bar,” the victim wrote in her statement. “At first mamasan seemed nice to me but then she would start scolding me again and tell me I’m just lying.”

This victim wrote one of the most detailed accounts of what happened at Blue House — but she isn’t alone.

‘I believed her words’

Federal prosecutors have said that Cha routinely would threaten her victims with arrest if they didn’t follow her orders. The women believed these threats because police officers frequented the lounge, said Jared Fishman, a trial attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice.

One of the other victims’ statements shows that Cha’s threats were powerful.

“She told me that if I leave work that night she would call for the police to look for me and arrest me then put me in jail,” wrote another victim, who was 23 at the time of the police raid. “I believed her words and I was scared of being arrested and so I stayed and do as I was told to do, I went and sat with customers.”

This victim also grew up in Chuuk, dreaming of becoming a doctor in the United States, according to her written statement. She also was lured to Guam by the promise of a high-paying job at a restaurant, according to her statement.

This woman came to Guam in March 2004. She worked at the Blue House for more than three years, but never got paid more than $100 to $300 per month, she wrote. The woman wrote that she had to resort to stealing bar chasers to eat.

The Blue House victims worked an average of 74 hours a week, without overtime, according to federal court documents.

“My first pay after one month of working was $300,” the victim wrote. “Mamasang showed me a paper showing that I earned $1,000 but after deductions my pay came down to $300 only. She explained that the deductions are for my airline ticket … for my birth certificate, departure fee, for sleeping while on the job, for being late to work, for speaking Chuukese, for eating chasers, for using too much toilet tissue, for using toothpicks, for use of shampoo, for using the phone …”

‘I did it and I cried’

These victim statements add a personal side to the allegations in the ongoing Blue House case, but they also provide a peek into the daily operations at the brothel.

There were six private rooms at the Blue House, according to federal prosecutors.

About 40 to 50 men went into the private rooms every night, wrote one victim, who worked at the Blue House lounge for about two months before the police raid.

“Then for myself about 10 to 20 men they force me to have sexual intercourse,” the victim wrote. “I did it and I cried and if I didn’t do it then they go out and complain then mamasang gets mad then she told me to get back. Then we are usually locked up in Blue House we cannot talk to our relatives then. Now I am happy I am relieved from torture.”

The five suspects in the Blue House case are expected to go to trial in the Superior Court of Guam in January. Several motions to dismiss the case are pending, and lengthy legal arguments are scheduled for Dec. 24.

Victim were forced Blue House women detail life at brothel

http://www.guampdn.com/videonetwork/2032075137001/Blue-House-From-2008-to-2012

Nine women were forced into prostitution at the Blue House lounge, and each of them has a story.

Blue House was a brothel that masqueraded as a karaoke lounge in Tamuning for four years. The brothel was shut down by a police raid in 2008, but the local court case — which now includes allegations against three police officers — continues today.

On the night of the police raid, some of the Blue House victims gave written statements to officers at the Tumon precinct. Later, other victims gave longer statements, which were folded into the Blue House case in the District Court of Guam.

Some of those statements describe how the women were lured from Chuuk. Others talk about how it took the women a few nights to realize what the Blue House lounge really was. Most of the statements explain that the women were trapped and powerless.

“And I did it because they forced me,” wrote one victim, who was 21 when she began to work at the Blue House lounge. “… I also did it feeling painfully and tortured. (The Blue House owner) said that I cannot run away because she would call the police. Then I myself have sexual intercourse with 12 men in the (VIP) room. Then I kept on crying because they said I can’t go see my relative’s home.”

‘I got really scared’

In her written statement, the Blue House victim wrote that she was the daughter of a minister in Chuuk.

Life was hard but happy in Chuuk, she wrote. But in 2007, she and her cousin decided to leave their home island after they were promised work in a restaurant in Guam.

Soon the cousins were in the Guam airport, where some people they didn’t know took away their passports and drove them to their new home. At Blue House, the women met Song Ja Cha, the owner of the lounge, who was called “mamasan” or “mamasang” by her workers.

After seeing the lounge, the women from Chuuk immediately wanted to return home, according to the written statement. In response, Cha said they would have to pay for passports and tickets to return home, so the cousins started working as waitresses at Blue House, not yet realizing the bar was a brothel.

For the first few nights, the 21-year-old victim didn’t know what the private rooms were for, she wrote.

“I got really scared when I understood what the small rooms were for but I didn’t even realize at that time … that I would have to have sex with the customers,” the victim wrote in her statement. “I was thinking that I should tell (my cousin) that we should run away but I couldn’t tell her because I saw there were people keeping their eyes on us and if they found out what we were talking about they would tell mamasang.”

After four nights of working at the lounge, Cha told the young woman to get drunk so she could “have a customer,” according to the victim statement. The woman obeyed, and later that night had sex for the first time with a Blue House customer.

The victim said she “got really sick” after.

“I did not work for two weeks because I believe I was gonna die. I just stayed in my room at the back of the bar,” the victim wrote in her statement. “At first mamasan seemed nice to me but then she would start scolding me again and tell me I’m just lying.”

This victim wrote one of the most detailed accounts of what happened at Blue House — but she isn’t alone.

‘I believed her words’

Federal prosecutors have said that Cha routinely would threaten her victims with arrest if they didn’t follow her orders. The women believed these threats because police officers frequented the lounge, said Jared Fishman, a trial attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice.

One of the other victims’ statements shows that Cha’s threats were powerful.

“She told me that if I leave work that night she would call for the police to look for me and arrest me then put me in jail,” wrote another victim, who was 23 at the time of the police raid. “I believed her words and I was scared of being arrested and so I stayed and do as I was told to do, I went and sat with customers.”

This victim also grew up in Chuuk, dreaming of becoming a doctor in the United States, according to her written statement. She also was lured to Guam by the promise of a high-paying job at a restaurant, according to her statement.

This woman came to Guam in March 2004. She worked at the Blue House for more than three years, but never got paid more than $100 to $300 per month, she wrote. The woman wrote that she had to resort to stealing bar chasers to eat.

The Blue House victims worked an average of 74 hours a week, without overtime, according to federal court documents.

“My first pay after one month of working was $300,” the victim wrote. “Mamasang showed me a paper showing that I earned $1,000 but after deductions my pay came down to $300 only. She explained that the deductions are for my airline ticket … for my birth certificate, departure fee, for sleeping while on the job, for being late to work, for speaking Chuukese, for eating chasers, for using too much toilet tissue, for using toothpicks, for use of shampoo, for using the phone …”

‘I did it and I cried’

These victim statements add a personal side to the allegations in the ongoing Blue House case, but they also provide a peek into the daily operations at the brothel.

There were six private rooms at the Blue House, according to federal prosecutors.

About 40 to 50 men went into the private rooms every night, wrote one victim, who worked at the Blue House lounge for about two months before the police raid.

“Then for myself about 10 to 20 men they force me to have sexual intercourse,” the victim wrote. “I did it and I cried and if I didn’t do it then they go out and complain then mamasang gets mad then she told me to get back. Then we are usually locked up in Blue House we cannot talk to our relatives then. Now I am happy I am relieved from torture.”

The five suspects in the Blue House case are expected to go to trial in the Superior Court of Guam in January. Several motions to dismiss the case are pending, and lengthy legal arguments are scheduled for Dec. 24.

Saipan Blog

Confidential documents in the Blue House case have revealed that more police officers allegedly had sex at the Tamuning brothel, according to defense motions filed in the Superior Court of Guam.

Somewhere within more than 1,000 pages of discovery documents are allegations that at least three more officers are connected to Blue House, and that another eight officers committed “misconduct or criminal activity,” wrote defense attorney William Pole.

Pole represents Officer David Manila, a suspect in the Blue House case, and his newest motions seek to get his client out of jail and dismiss the case for “prosecutorial vindictiveness.”

Pole argues that prosecutors have received allegations against many police officers in the Blue House case, but have chosen to prosecute only a few.

“The most troubling evidence against the government is that there are other officers accused of misconduct by the same alleged victims that have accused Officer Manila,” Pole states in one of his motions. “There is no evidence that these officers have been charged or interviewed… The government has provided, in its own discovery, a list of officers who are accused of having sexual relations, taking favors or otherwise cannot account for why they spent time at Blue House.

Although the defense motions are part of the public court record, the discovery documents that they reference are confidential. Discovery documents are potential evidence that is only available to attorneys in the case. None of the officers who face allegations in the discovery documents have been identified in any public document.

During an interview with the Guam Blog yesterday, Pole said he didn’t intend to endorse any of the allegations in the discovery documents. The goal of his motion was to show that prosecutors haven’t treated all accused officers the same, he said.

“If I were to accuse 10 people, and I now charge three people, then I would need to explain why I didn’t go and investigate the other seven,” Pole said.

The Office of the Attorney General hasn’t responded to either of Pole’s motions. AG spokeswoman Carlina Charfauros declined to comment on the motions, saying that prosecutors plan to allow their response documents to “speak for themselves.”

Manila is one of three police officers indicted in the Blue House case in late November.

The other two are Mario Laxamana and Anthony Quenga, and all three officers are accused of assisting the Blue House brothel, which was open from 2004 to 2008. Anthony Quenga and David Manila also were charged with first-degree criminal sexual conduct, which can carry a life sentence.

David Manila previously admitted to at least some involvement with the brothel.

In 2011, during a federal trial of brothel owner Song Ja Cha, Manila admitted in federal court that he once had sex with a Blue House employee after paying for a ladies drink. The officer also testified that he once “advised” an employee that she couldn’t leave the lounge until she had paid off her debts to Cha.

During that same trial, Freda Eseun, a supervisor at Blue House, testified that officers named “Mario” and “Tony” frequented the brothel. Regardless, no police officers were fired, arrested or prosecuted for ties to the Blue House after the federal trial.

The three officers who currently face charges were arrested after a series of articles by the Guam Blog, which prompted the Guam Police Department to reopen the case.

In his motion to dismiss, attorney Pole argues that the prosecutors buckled to political pressure and public outcry. If the government had a legitimate reason to prosecute Manila, it should have happened years ago, Pole argued in the motion.

“The government must give an explanation on why it took so long to charge defendant Manila. The Office of the Attorney General knew about the federal investigation, the government knew about any alleged allegations against David Manila in 2008 and the government chose to file only after a media storm erupted,” Pole wrote.

The motion to dismiss for prosecutorial vindictiveness isn’t the only motion that seeks to end the Blue House case before trial.

Several other motions are pending before Judge Sukola, and the judge yesterday denied two other dismissal motions, which argued statute of limitations and failure to appear before a judge within 48 hours.

The Blue House case is set for jury selection on Jan. 2.