Tag Archives: hawaii

Nominee says GMH ‘killing patients’

Dr. Samuel Friedman, second from left, listens during a confirmation hearing for him to serve as a member of the Guam Board of Medical Examiners. The hearing was held at the Guam Legislature in Hagåtña yesterday.Dr. Samuel Friedman, second from left, listens during a confirmation hearing for him to serve as a member of the Guam Board of Medical Examiners. The hearing was held at the Guam Legislature in Hagåtña yesterday.

A Guam doctor yesterday told lawmakers that Guam Memorial Hospital isn’t safe for patients. He said island doctors kill patients.

“The hospital is a basket case, to put it in a mild fashion. There are doctors on the island who are hurting patients, who are killing patients. And these aren’t sick patients,” oncologist Dr. Sam Friedman said during his confirmation hearing yesterday.

“There’s no accountability that I see until there’s a fuss made in the paper. This shouldn’t be happening in a Western world,” he said.

Friedman was appointed by Gov. Eddie Calvo to the Guam Board of Medical Examiners, which oversees local licensing for medical practitioners on Guam.

During the hearing, Friedman made allegations of serious incompetence and misconduct by medical practitioners on island — including an allegation that a woman recently died while in labor because of a mistake by a medical professional.

“There was a young woman who died in labor two months ago. Totally preventable case. Something that a junior medical student wouldn’t do,” said Friedman.

Friedman didn’t elaborate on the case.

Interim Hospital Administrator Rey Vega didn’t return phone calls yesterday for comment. When asked about the accusations of misconduct and incompetence at GMH, Troy Torres, director of communications for the Calvo administration, said Vega “is looking into the statements made by Dr. Friedman.”

Friedman also addressed a dispute between himself and a nurse at the hospital, spoke about his critical position on the accreditation of GMH, and explained why he gave up his hospital privileges three years ago.

Vacancy in dispute

But even before those issues were addressed, senators first wrangled with whether there was a vacancy on the board to which he was appointed.

Democratic Sen. Dennis Rodriguez, chairman of the health committee, said his office was investigating whether there was a vacancy on the board. He said it was unclear if a law passed to limit terms on certain boards, including the Guam Board of Medical Examiners, violated the Organic Act of Guam.

According to James Canto, chief legal counsel of the Calvo administration, all seven appointments have expired. The members of the board are: Joan Gill; James Murphy; James Stadler; Patrick Santos; Ricardo Eusebio; Ronald Kobayashi; and Julie G. Lujan, Canto said.

Racism allegation

In written testimony provided to the committee, Cely Mangrobang, a nurse supervisor at GMH, accused Friedman of racism against Filipino nurses.

“Dr. Sam Friedman’s behavior toward our nurses was extremely unprofessional and can even be considered racist,” wrote Mangrobang. “He made derogatory remarks to our staff of particular, negative attention to Filipino nurses. He said, ‘Filipino nurses are stupid and incompetent.’ His statement not only insults our wonderful, hard-working Filipino nurses, but also our health-care profession in general.”

Friedman called the accusation of derogatory remarks “lies” and said that his interaction with Mangrobang was limited to a single altercation five years ago.

He told senators that, at the time, he was treating an “extremely ill” patient, and gave instructions to a nurse to give the patient a drug by continuous infusion over seven days.

“I got a call from the nurse on the board that, oops, she gave the seven-day dose … in an hour, which could have been a fatal error,” said Friedman.

He said he confronted Mangrobang, as the nursing supervisor, about the error, “this woman yelled at me for 45 minutes, half an hour.”

Rodriguez said his office received phone calls and testimony submitted in response to Friedman’s appointment. According to documents received by the Pacific Daily News, approximately 95 people, many of whom said they were nurses, signed several petitions opposing Friedman’s appointment the board.

GMH privileges

Friedman also addressed concerns about the fact that he no longer has privileges at GMH.

He told legislators he gave up privileges at GMH three years ago after he submitted paperwork to renew the privilege but got a letter that said he hadn’t. He said after repeated efforts to contact the administrator with no response, he gave up.

“To hell with them,” Friedman said.

Vice Speaker Benjamin Cruz asked Friedman if it would be important that someone approved for practice on Guam have privileges at GMH.

Friedman said it would depend on what the doctor would be doing and noted that he treats patients outside of GMH. He said he can treat patients in one hour, while it would take 24 hours at GMH, and that he could do so at a fraction of the cost.

“I think when the hospital gets up to the standard of care where it’s safe to put patients in — which it isn’t now, but hopefully will be shortly –yes, I agree,” Friedman said. “I think, right now, it’s not safe for many patients to be there.”

Accreditation

Friedman also said he wasn’t opposed to the recently obtained accreditation by the Joint Commission, but said maintaining the accreditation is “costing a tremendous amount of money” and not necessarily improving patient care.

“Even though you have the hospital approved by (the Joint Commission), it doesn’t look at medical care of patients,” he told senators. “It looks at an overall medical spectrum. … It doesn’t look at medical care. That is the job of committees composed of doctors, which is not happening.”

Friedman is no stranger to controversy. In 2009 he said he was resigning from his job at the Cancer Center of Guam and leaving Guam — citing alleged corruption in the medical community and criticism on Internet message boards.

Chief Police Paul Suba

Punch of weirdos.  Kudos to Lt. Gov Mike Cruz for your understanding in removing Mr. Suba from his position as Chief of police. In this modern world, it will be better off without him. He criminalizes a lot of innocence especially those from the Micronesian islands. He is such a big racist who came from the Phillipines.

Chief Suba needs to be fired.  He’s a fuck’n racist and coward .  He thinks he’s a fuck’n military commander in a combat zone.  Cut from the top and we’ll have a professional police force.

Im sure if it was a FSM citizen or Chuukese to be exact that did something like this Im sure it’ll be done differently and more harshly and that chief of police guy should just shut it cuz honestly guam police is nonsense and nothing is ever done when it comes to our kind.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f4jqImwFX2k&feature=related

Paul Suba

Paul Suba
Acting Chief of Police Paul Suba

AMID a flurry of media criticism and his leadership being called into question, Guam police chief Paul Suba yesterday stepped down from his post after his meeting with acting Gov. Mike Cruz.

Suba’s resignation was effective yesterday.

“I will take 20 days of administrative leave to ensure a smooth transition and exhaust my annual leave before retirement,” Suba said in a press statement.

Cruz announced the appointment of Major Rick Leon Guerrero as acting chief of police. Leon Guerrero will also continue his role as acting police commander.

Cruz told the media that if Suba had not tendered his resignation, he would have fired him.

Suba came under fire last week as a result of GPD’s search on KUAM studios, where investigators confiscated a document related to the polygraph test for spokesman John Edwards.

Difficult decision

Governor Felix Camacho is currently off island. Last week, Cruz urged the governor to replace Suba, saying his lack of leadership has diminished the confidence of the people in the police department.

Cruz said he accepted Suba’s request for retirement after consulting with the governor.

Although Suba’s resignation will mean a change in leadership at GPD, Cruz said he will not lose his faith in the men and women of that department.

Cruz said the decision was difficult for him since he considers Suba a friend.

“Sometimes friends are difficult to part with and for me, it was an issue of making sure our departments are going to be able to do the job that they’re created to do,” Cruz said.

“And so, that was my decision. We needed to find somebody else to do it,” the acting governor said, noting his lack of confidence in Suba’s effective leadership.

Cruz said the governor was aware of his decision to meet with Suba yesterday.

“Obviously, [the governor] is also a friend of the chief’s and I think that he was obviously sad about the fact that we were seeing a friend depart as one of our leaders,” Cruz said. “Hopefully we can restore the public’s confidence in the police department with new leadership.”

Uncomfortable

Cruz clarified that although the governor said last week he needed more time before deciding on Suba’s fate, the governor never stated that letting go of Suba was a decision he wouldn’t make.

“It was a little bit uncomfortable but the governor never stated that it was not the decision he wanted to make. It was just a matter of getting some investigation and a better understanding of the situation,” Cruz said. “And in my discussions with him earlier, he understood that this was a matter that needed to take place.”

Cruz said yesterday he was confident that Leon Guerrero will restore public confidence in the police department. “We served together in the Guam Army National Guard. He’s a long time veteran of the police force. And at least in my discussions with the rank and file, he’s respected and fair,” the acting governor said.

“The process takes some time and he will be on administrative leave for a period of time as he starts the process of retiring,” Cruz said.

Public safety committee chairman Sen. Adolpho Palacios Sr. said he respected Cruz’s actions on Suba’s resignation, saying the new development at the police force will now allow officials to focus on moving ahead with what needs to be done at GPD.

Distractions

“There are many distractions that don’t have much to do with police work and GPD needs to move beyond that,” said Palacios.

Palacios said that his oversight hearing scheduled for May 24, 9 a.m. in the public hearing room to discuss the hiring practices at GPD and search warrant application by GPD will be held since it doesn’t particularly focus on Suba, but rather issues that pertain to the department.

Palacios said that he expects last Wednesday’s issued search warrant of KUAM will be a topic of discussion, but Palacios said he will not call into question Superior Court Judge Anita Sukola’s decision to issue one.

Source :  Paul Suba Steps Down

Guam Dive

Guam Dive

Guam Dive

Learn about the best of Diving on Guam and what it has to offer.

Paul Suba Steps Down

Paul Suba

Acting Chief of Police Paul Suba

AMID a flurry of media criticism and his leadership being called into question, Guam police chief Paul Suba yesterday stepped down from his post after his meeting with acting Gov. Mike Cruz.

Suba’s resignation was effective yesterday.

“I will take 20 days of administrative leave to ensure a smooth transition and exhaust my annual leave before retirement,” Suba said in a press statement.

Cruz announced the appointment of Major Rick Leon Guerrero as acting chief of police. Leon Guerrero will also continue his role as acting police commander.

Cruz told the media that if Paul Suba had not tendered his resignation, he would have fired him.

Paul Suba came under fire last week as a result of GPD’s search on KUAM studios, where investigators confiscated a document related to the polygraph test for spokesman John Edwards.

Difficult decision

Governor Felix Camacho is currently off island. Last week, Cruz urged the governor to replace Suba, saying his lack of leadership has diminished the confidence of the people in the police department.

Cruz said he accepted Suba’s request for retirement after consulting with the governor.

Although Suba’s resignation will mean a change in leadership at GPD, Cruz said he will not lose his faith in the men and women of that department.

Cruz said the decision was difficult for him since he considers Paul Suba a friend.

“Sometimes friends are difficult to part with and for me, it was an issue of making sure our departments are going to be able to do the job that they’re created to do,” Cruz said.

“And so, that was my decision. We needed to find somebody else to do it,” the acting governor said, noting his lack of confidence in Suba’s effective leadership.

Cruz said the governor was aware of his decision to meet with Paul Suba yesterday.

“Obviously, [the governor] is also a friend of the chief’s and I think that he was obviously sad about the fact that we were seeing a friend depart as one of our leaders,” Cruz said. “Hopefully we can restore the public’s confidence in the police department with new leadership.”

Uncomfortable

Cruz clarified that although the governor said last week he needed more time before deciding on Suba’s fate, the governor never stated that letting go of Suba was a decision he wouldn’t make.

“It was a little bit uncomfortable but the governor never stated that it was not the decision he wanted to make. It was just a matter of getting some investigation and a better understanding of the situation,” Cruz said. “And in my discussions with him earlier, he understood that this was a matter that needed to take place.”

Cruz said yesterday he was confident that Leon Guerrero will restore public confidence in the police department. “We served together in the Guam Army National Guard. He’s a long time veteran of the police force. And at least in my discussions with the rank and file, he’s respected and fair,” the acting governor said.

“The process takes some time and he will be on administrative leave for a period of time as he starts the process of retiring,” Cruz said.

Public safety committee chairman Sen. Adolpho Palacios Sr. said he respected Cruz’s actions on Suba’s resignation, saying the new development at the police force will now allow officials to focus on moving ahead with what needs to be done at GPD.

Distractions

“There are many distractions that don’t have much to do with police work and GPD needs to move beyond that,” said Palacios.

Palacios said that his oversight hearing scheduled for May 24, 9 a.m. in the public hearing room to discuss the hiring practices at GPD and search warrant application by GPD will be held since it doesn’t particularly focus on Paul  Suba, but rather issues that pertain to the department.

Palacios said that he expects last Wednesday’s issued search warrant of KUAM will be a topic of discussion, but Palacios said he will not call into question Superior Court Judge Anita Sukola’s decision to issue one.

Source :  Paul Suba Steps Down

Guam

Guam is an island in the western Pacific Ocean and is an organized, unincorporated territory of the United States. It is one of five U.S. territories with an established civilian government. The island’s capital is Hagåtña (formerly Agana). Guam is the largest and southernmost of the Mariana Islands.

The Chamorros, Guam‘s indigenous people, first populated the island approximately 4,000 years ago. The island has a long history of European colonialism. First discovered by Europeans by Ferdinand Magellan on March 6, 1521, the first colony was established in 1668 by Spain with the arrival of settlers including Padre San Vitores, a Catholic missionary. The island was controlled by Spain until 1898, when it was surrendered to the United States as part of the Treaty of Paris following the Spanish-American War.

As the largest island in Micronesia and the only U.S.-held island in the region before World War II, Guam was captured by the Japanese on December 8, 1941, hours after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, and was occupied for two and a half years.

During the occupation, the people of Guam underwent acts including torture, beheadings, and rape, and were forced to adopt the Japanese culture. Guam was subject to fierce fighting when US troops recaptured the island on July 21, 1944, a date commemorated every year as Liberation Day. Today, Guam‘s economy is supported by its principal industry, tourism, which is composed primarily of visitors from Japan. Guam‘s second-largest source of income is the United States military.

Hello world!

Welcome to Guam Night

Guam Blog

Guam Blog

Guam Blog

Guam Blog

Guam Blog

Guam Blog

Guam Blog

Guam Blog

Guam Blog

Guam Blog

Guam Blog

Guam Blog

Guam Blog

Guam Blog

Guam Blog